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Support at HomeTimes TablesCalculationReadingGrammar

As part of the National Curriculum, within each year band, we teach a wide range of mathematical concepts, some of which might be new to you as a parentor some of which you haven’t come across for some time; therefore, we have put together a support page which includes various support with different concepts within the curriculum.

If you require any further guidance, please speak to your child’s class teacher who’ll be able to assist you further and provide you with appropriate materials/resources to support this area of learning at home.

Click here to view the parents guide to the curriculum

Across the academy, we place great emphasis on the teaching of times tables and the related division facts. It is a key skill for pupils to know their times tables, and to be able to recall and use them in different contexts.

Throughout each week, the children practise, use and apply their times table and division knowledge. We believe that it is important that children continue to practise their times tables at home, therefore we have created this leaflet to provide parents and carers with ideas which they could use at home to support their child with learning their tables.

We hope that you find it useful. If you would like any further advice or resources, please see your child’s class teacher.

Year Band Expectations: Times Tables and Division

Year One: To be able to count in multiples of twos, fives, and tens.

Year Two: To recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5, and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers. Division facts would include 10÷2=5 or 25÷5=25 for example.

Year Three: To recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4, and 8 multiplication tables.

Year Four: To know and recall all times tables up to 12 x 12 and the related division facts.

Year Five: To use known multiplication and division facts to calculate related facts e.g. 7 x 6 = 42 which means I can calculate 0.7 x 6 = 4.2 and 70 x 60 = 4200.

Year Six: To use and apply all of the above in different contexts.

Useful Websites

Below is a list of useful websites/Apps containing numerous fun, educational games for your child to play at home to reinforce their knowledge and understanding of times tables.

Websites:

Ideas for Practising Times Tables with your Child at Home

Multiplication Square

Being able to spot patterns in numbers is an important skill, and it can also help with learning times tables. Children can investigate the following rules to see if they are true or false:

  • Odd number x odd number = odd number
  • Even number x even number = even number
  • Odd number x even number = even number

Multiplication Snap

You will need a pack of cards for this game.

Flip the cards over as if you are playing snap.

The first person to say the fact based on the cards turned over (a 4 and a 6 = 24) gets the cards.

The person with the most cards wins.

Bingo

This game needs two players.

Make a grid of six squares on a piece of paper and ask your child to write a number in each square from their target times tables. Give them a tables fact related to the facts they are working on and if they have the answer, they can cross it off. The first person to mark all of their numbers off is the winner.

Looking for Patterns

Being able to spot patterns in numbers is an important skill, and it can also help with learning times tables. Children can investigate the following rules to see if they are true or false:

Odd number x odd number = odd number

Even number x even number = even number

Odd number x even number = even number

Double, Double

A trick for learning the four times table is to double, double. Double the number, and then double it again.

E.g. 3 x 4 – double 3 is 6, double 6 is 12, so 3 x 4 = 12

4 x 4 – double 4 is 8, double 8 is 16, so 4 x 4 = 16

Tricky Sixes

Six times tables can be tricky to learn. One helpful trick is that in the 6 times tables, when you multiply an even number by 6, they both end in the same digit.

E.g.

2x 6 = 12

4x 6 = 24

6x 6 = 36

8x 6 = 48

Speed Tables

Timed challenges are a good way of helping your child to recall times tables rapidly. Some ideas for this include:

Time how long it takes to write out a times table, then try to beat the time.

Time your child to complete their times table homework tasks. Can they beat their time?

Race against people at home to recall their tables the quickest.

See how many multiples of their target times tables they can write down or say aloud in a given time limit.

Times Table Tennis

Imagine you are playing tennis and bat the multiples of your child’s target times tables over the net. They could bat back the related division fact.

Use Times Table in Real Life Situations

Examples:

Saving 4p a day would lead to saving how much in a week, two weeks etc.

Sweets cost 12p each. How much would it cost for 8 sweets?

We need 8 chocolate bars which cost 10p each. How many can we buy with 80p?

Beat your Partner

Two players are needed for this game. The players stand back to back to each other. Ask the pair a question and whoever knows the answer turns around and shouts ‘gotcha’ followed by the answer. Their partner then says the related division fact.

Body Times Tables

Children can use their bodies to learn their times tables. Decide on a physical movement that represents 1x, 2x, 3x etc. and the children can run through this routine as they chant their tables. For example, 1x could be tapping the left shoulder, 2x the right shoulder, 3x bending the right leg etc.

Buzz

This games requires at least two players.

Choose a times table to focus on. The first person says 1, the second 2 and so on. However, if a person lands on a number which is a multiple of the times table, they must say buzz. If a person forgets to say buzz or says it at the wrong time, they are out.

At Eaton Park Academy, we teach different written methods for each of the mathematical operations – addition, subtraction, division and multiplication. The links below provide short videos which model and explain the written methods we teach at Eaton Park.

Short Multiplication

Long Multiplication

Short Division

Long Division

Addition

Subtraction

Top tips for keeping up with reading with your child/children.

Visit Your Local Library

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

It’s free and children love choosing their own books to read. Remember if the book your child chooses to read is too tricky for them to read independently then read it to them or share the reading. Lots of libraries have free storytelling events and competitions so look out for those too.

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

Encourage your child to choose books relating to a topic that they’re really interested in. Librarians are a good source of information for popular books and most libraries also run schemes and competitions during the holidays as well as having a range of activities that your child can join in with – so use them!

Making Reading Fun with the Internet

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

Visit the Oxford Owl Librarywhich has lots of free eBooks to read, and fun games to play, and there are lots of other good sites to visit too.

Try these:

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

Use the internet to search out author blogs and sites, book previews and trailers as well as general articles or reports on books. Many websites have great ideas and links to suitable topics to engage and encourage older readers. TryCBBCorYouTubefor a preview of a Horrible Histories book. Visit theOxford Owl Libraryfor a range of free eBooks that will appeal to older children.

Out and About

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

When you are out and about in the car, on the bus or out for a walk, see how many signs you can spot. Road signs, street signs, shop signs and timetables… Read them together with your child.

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

When travelling, encourage your child to help when reading directions, looking out for road signs and talking about how long they have to travel or how far they have left. Reading timetables is also a great skill for them to develop – bus, train and tube – and will encourage their independence as well.Boysoften particularly enjoy this.

Cooking

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

Does your child enjoy cooking? Find a recipe, read the list of ingredients together, visit the shops and read the food labels, and then support your child to read the instructions as you make your favourite recipe.

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

If your child likes to cook, encourage them to read the instructions in recipes and plan for what is needed. Some fun ones include Roald Dahl’sRevolting Recipes(Puffin),The Silver Spoon for Children, Jamie Oliver and school dinner lady Nora Sands’Nora’s Kitchen(Collins), orGrow it, Eat it(RHS and Dorling Kindersley). But if you don’t know these, any will do.

Holiday Scrapbook

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

During holiday time, collect items of interest and stick them all in a scrapbook or write a simple holiday diary. As you stick these items in, chat about your child’s choices and favourite things to do. You will have created a book full of happy memories that your child can read again and again. Your child’s teacher would also love to share this book with the class when term begins.

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

Suggest making an up-to-date scrapbook online, using a blogthat enables your child to upload pictures of their holiday and write about their experiences which can then be shared with family and friends and even the wider world. You may want to check the site your child is using for safety.

In the News

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

Encourage your child to read newspapers and find out what is going on in the world. TryFirst News, a children’s paper aimed at 7–14 year olds, orCBBC Newsround online, as a change from television. You may want to be around if stories are of a sensitive nature, but talk to your child about what they have read. Use local papers to read about local events.

Shopping

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

When doing your weekly shop, encourage your child to help with the shopping by writing and reading the list as well as finding products in store or online. If they need new school shoes or new school uniform, get them to do some research online first to make the trip to the shops more efficient.Boysmay respond particularly well to this idea and it’s all good reading practice.

Playing Outside
Creating

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

If your child enjoys making up their own stories, encourage this by usingwww.storybird.comto help them design their own picture book. The site was started for families so is well monitored and very safe. The professional-looking end product can be printed in a proper hardback book for your child to keep and share with others.

Sharing and Reading to Others

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

Children love to share reading skills with family members so if you are visiting family then take reading books with you so someone different can say how proud they are hearing your child read. It’s a good chance to show off!

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

If your child enjoys making up their own stories, encourage this by usingwww.storybird.comto help them design their own picture book. The site was started for families so is well monitored and very safe. The professional-looking end product can be printed in a proper hardback book for your child to keep and share with others.

Postcards and Cards

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

At special times of the year or celebrations, enjoy opening the post together to read Christmas cards, birthday cards, or letters from family and friends. Ask family and friends to write your child postcards whilst they are away on their holidays. Children love to read a postcard addressed to them. Don’t forget to send return post too – whether it’s snail mail or via technology.

Relaxing

Younger Children: 4 to 7 Years

Build a den or hideout with your child out of dark blankets or sheets. Ask your child to choose some of their books to take into the den to read. Don’t forget the torch – it’s exciting to read a book by torch light!

Older Children: 7 to 11 Years

Help your child create a ‘reading and dreaming’ place in your home. This could be a window seat with comfy cushions, an indoor pop-up tent with a cosy blanket, or even a corner in a garden shed with a seat. Let the rest of the family know that if your child is in her/his special place they should try not to disturb them. You may even get some peace then too!

Spelling, grammar and punctuation (SPAG) are key elements of the National Curriculum for English.

The links below provide support withthe differentgrammatical concepts taught throughout the academy.

KS2 Tricky Grammar Concepts

Year 1 & 2 Punctuation and Grammar

Year 3 & 4 Punctuation and Grammar

Year 5 & 6 Punctuation and Grammar

Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling made Easy

If you require a paper copy of any of the pages / documents published on this website, please click here and complete the form stating which page(s) / document(s) you require along with your name and address.